Minerals and Waste Local Plan: Pre-Submission Publication

Ended on the 19 December 2022
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APPENDICES

Appendix 1 – Existing Core Strategy and Development Management Policies

Policy

Replaced / deleted

New Local Plan Policy

Policy CS1: Minerals extraction

Replaced

Policy MP1: Provision for minerals extraction

Policy CS2: General locations for mineral extraction and associated facilities

Replaced

Policy MP2: Spatial strategy for minerals extraction

Policy CS3: Waste management capacity to be provided

Replaced

Policy WP1: New waste management capacity to be provided

Policy CS4: New waste management capacity to be provided

Replaced

Policy WP1: New waste management capacity to be provided

Policy CS5: General locations for waste management facilities

Replaced

Policy WP2: Spatial strategy for waste management facilities

Policy CS6: General waste management considerations

Replaced

Policy WP3: Land suitable for waste management facilities

Policy CS7: Recycling, composting, anaerobic digestion and waste transfer stations

Replaced

Policy WP4: Recycling or transfer of inert CD&E waste

Policy WP5: Waste transfer stations, MRF, ELV facilities and WEEE recovery facilities

Policy WP6: Transfer, storage, processing and treatment of hazardous waste

Policy WP8: Composting

Policy WP9: Anaerobic digestion

Policy CS8: Residual waste treatment facilities

Replaced

Policy WP10: Residual waste treatment facilities

Policy CS9: Inert waste landfill

Replaced

Policy WP11: Disposal of inert waste by landfill

Policy CS10: Non-hazardous and hazardous waste landfill

Replaced

Policy WP12: Non-hazardous and hazardous waste landfill

Policy CS11: wastewater / sewerage infrastructure and treatment facilities

Replaced

Policy WP14: Water recycling centres

Policy CS12: Whitlingham wastewater treatment works

Replaced

Policy WP15: Whitlingham WRC

Policy CS13: Climate change and renewable energy generation

Replaced

Policy MW3: Climate change adaption and mitigation

Policy CS14: Environmental protection

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy MW4: Breckland SPA

Policy CS15: Transport

Replaced

Policy MW2: Transport

Policy CS16: Safeguarding mineral and waste sites and mineral resources

Replaced

Policy MP10: Safeguarding mineral infrastructure

Policy MP11: Safeguarding mineral resources

Policy WP17: Safeguarding waste management facilities

Policy CS17: Use of secondary and recycling aggregates

Replaced

Policy WP4: Recycling or transfer of inert CD&E waste

Policy DM1: Nature conservation

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM2: Core river valleys

Replaced

Policy MP5: Core River Valleys

Policy DM3: Groundwater and surface water

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM4: Flood Risk

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM5: Borrow pits and agricultural or potable water reservoirs

Replaced

Policy MP3: Borrow pits

Policy MP4: Agricultural or potable water reservoirs

Policy DM6: Household Waste Recycling Centres

Replaced

Policy WP7: Household Waste Recycling Centres

Policy DM7: Safeguarding aerodromes

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM8: Design, local landscape and townscape character

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM9: Archaeological sites

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM10: Transport

Replaced

Policy MW2: Transport

Policy DM11: Sustainable construction and operations

Replaced

Policy MW3: Climate change mitigation and adaption

Policy DM12: Amenity

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM13: Air Quality

Replaced

Policy MW1: Development Management Criteria

Policy DM14: Progressive working, restoration and afteruse

Replaced

Policy MP7: Progressive working, restoration and afteruse

Policy DM15: Cumulative impacts

Replaced

Policy MP6: Cumulative impacts and phasing of workings

Policy DM16: Soils

Replaced

Policy MW5: Agricultural soils

(1) Appendix 2 – Existing Mineral Site Specific Allocations and Areas of Search Policies

Minerals SSA Policy

Site location

Mineral resource (tonnes)

Replaced / deleted

New Local Plan Policy

Reason for deletion

SD1 – Sustainable Development

N/A

N/A

Deleted

N/A

This policy repeats the presumption in favour of sustainable development in the NPPF and therefore is not necessary.

MIN 10

Land off Fakenham Road, Beetley

2,400,000 tonnes sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 12: land north of Chapel Lane, Beetley

N/A

MIN 51

Land west of Bilney Road, Beetley

1,300,000 tonnes sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 51 / MIN 13 / MIN 08: land west of Bilney Road, Beetley

N/A

MIN 102

Land at North Farm, south of the River Thet, Snetterton

1,500,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The site is not allocated because of its proximity to Swangey Fen SSSI. There is the potential for unacceptable adverse effects on the SSSI from the proposed mineral extraction. The site is less deliverable than other proposed sites.

MIN 108

Land to the north of Hargham Road, Shropham

150,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The landowner no longer wants the site to be considered for mineral extraction

MIN 109

Land to the south of Honeypots Quarry, Shropham

350,000 to 400,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The landowner no longer wants the site to be considered for mineral extraction

MIN 110

Land to the south of Spong Lane, Shropham

150,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The landowner no longer wants the site to be considered for mineral extraction

MIN 37

Land at Mayton Wood, Coltishall Road, Frettenham

1,450,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 37: land at Mayton Wood, Coltishall Road, Buxton

N/A

MIN 48

Swannington Bottom Plantation, Felthorpe

1,900,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The site is not allocated because of its proximity to Swannington Upgate Common SSSI. There is the potential for unacceptable adverse effects on the SSSI from the proposed mineral extraction. The site is less deliverable than other proposed sites.

MIN 55

Land at Keepers Cottage, Attlebridge

525,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The site is not allocated because it is less deliverable than other proposed sites due to its small area and being surrounded on most sides by a restored landfill site.

MIN 64

Horstead Quarry, Grange Farm, Horstead

950,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 64: land at Grange Farm, Buxton Road, Horstead

N/A

MIN 96

Land at Grange Farm, Spixworth

1,000,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 96: land at Grange Farm, Spixworth

N/A

MIN 6

Land off East Winch Road, Mill Drove, Middleton

1,416,000 tonnes of carstone

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 6: land of East Winch Road, Mill Drove, Middleton

N/A

MIN 19

Eastern extension to Pentney Quarry

700,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The site is not allocated because it is within a Core River Valley and the restoration would not result in enhancement to the landscape sufficient to justify mineral extraction.

MIN 40

Land to the east of Grandcourt Farm, East Winch

3,000,000 tonnes of silica sand

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 40: land east of Grandcourt Farm, East Winch

N/A

Policy MIN 45

Coxford Abbey Quarry, East Rudham

3,600,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

Part of this site received planning permission in May 2014 which has been implemented. The remaining part of the site is not allocated because it is on a Plantation on Ancient Woodland and there are not wholly exceptional reasons for the development.

MIN 75

Home Farm, Watlington

335,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in November 2015 and the permission has been implemented.

MIN 76

West Field, Watlington

285,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in April 2019 and the permission has been implemented.

SIL01

Land at Mintlyn South, Bawsey

1,200,000 tonnes of silica sand

Replaced

SSA Policy SIL 01: land at Mintlyn South, Bawsey

N/A

Areas of Search Policy for silica sand extraction

Marham, Runcton Holme, Tottenhill, Shouldham, Shouldham Thorpe, Stow Bardolph, Wormegay

Unknown – areas of search

Replaced

Policy MPSS1: silica sand extraction sites

N/A

MIN 69

Land north of Holt Road, Aylmerton

750,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 69: land north of Holt Road, Aylmerton

N/A

MIN 71

Land to the west of Norwich Road, Lodge Farm, Holt

1,100,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The site is not allocated because of its proximity to Holt Lowes SSSI and its location in the Glaven Valley Conservation Area. There is the potential for unacceptable adverse effects on the SSSI from the proposed mineral extraction.

MIN 84

Land south of Holt Road, East Beckham

1,600,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in August 2014 and the permission has been implemented

MIN 115

Land at Lord Anson's wood, near north Walsham

1,100,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Replaced

SSA Policy MIN 115: land at Lord Anson's Wood, near North Walsham

N/A

MIN 79

Land north of Hickling Lane, Swardeston

1,750,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The site is not allocated because the proposed highway access is unacceptable.

MIN 80

Land south of Mangreen Hall Farm, Swardeston

760,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

The mineral operator and landowner no longer want the site to be considered for mineral extraction.

MIN 81

Land south of Mangreen Lane, Stoke Holy Cross

955,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in October 2015 and the permission has been implemented

MIN 83

Extension to Norton Subcourse Quarry, Loddon Road

674,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in February 2015 and the permission has been implemented

MIN 90

Extension to Norton Subcourse Quarry, Loddon Road

511,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in February 2015 and the permission has been implemented

MIN 91

Extension to Norton Subcourse Quarry, Loddon Road

1,146,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in February 2015 and the permission has been implemented

MIN 118

Land at Hall Farm, Wymondham

600,000 tonnes of sand and gravel

Deleted

N/A

This site received planning permission in January 2014 and the permission has been implemented.

Appendix 3 – Existing Waste Site Specific Allocations Policies

Waste SSA Policy

Site location

Site Proposal

Replaced / deleted

Reason for deletion and/or replacement Local Plan policy

Policy SD1 - Sustainable Development

N/A

N/A

Deleted

The policy repeats the presumption in favour of sustainable development in the NPPF and therefore is not necessary.

WWTW1

Whitlingham Water Recycling Centre

Continued operation of the Water Recycling Centre

Replaced

Replaced by Policy WP15

WAS 01

Land at Beck Farm, East Bilney, East Dereham

Inert waste recycling and inert landfill

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4 and WP11 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 87

Land west of Bilney Road, Beetley

Inert waste recycling and inert landfill

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • The proposal is associated with a specific site allocation for mineral extraction
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4 and WP11 and site allocation policy MIN 51/ MIN 13/ MIN 08 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 06

Land off B1108 Norwich Road, Carbrooke

Inert recycling, and the reworking, removal and reuse of previously deposited foundry sand.

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP4 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 14

Land at Ashill Recycling Centre, Swaffham Road, Ashill

Composting, inert waste recycling and/or extension to the HWRC

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8, WP4 and/or WP7 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 19

Land at Harling Road, Snetterton

composting, anaerobic digestion, processing of recyclables, inert waste recycling, HWRC and/or residual waste treatment processes, including energy-from-waste, thermal treatment and/or mixed waste processing

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8, WP9, WP4, WP5, WP7 and/or WP10 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 32

Land at Thetford Transfer Station, Burrell Way, Thetford

processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling and/or HWRC

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than one hectare in size
  • The site is in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4, WP5 and/or WP7 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 47

Land at West Carr Road, Attleborough

Inert waste recycling and/or waste transfer

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The site is partly in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4 and/or WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 79

Land at North Farm, Snetterton

Inert landfill and secondary aggregate recycling

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • The site is not allocated for prior mineral extraction
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4 and WP11 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 17

Land at Mayton Wood closed landfill site, Little Hautbois Road

Household waste recycling centre

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than one hectare in size
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The majority of the site is in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP7 would be relevant to the decision-making process.

WAS 68

Land near Mayton Wood closed landfill site, Coltishall Road

Inert landfill

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP11 and site allocation policy MIN 37 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 24

Land at Keeper's Cottage, Attlebridge

Composting, inert landfill or non-hazardous landfill

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The site is not allocated for prior mineral extraction
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8, WP11 and/or WP12 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 76

Land at SPC Atlas Works, Lenwade

Scrap metal recycling facility

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than one hectare in size
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 78

Land at SPC Atlas Works, Lenwade

mixed waste processing, metal recycling, inert waste recycling, in-vessel composting, physical, chemical, and/or mechanical/ biological treatment of household waste, waste transfer, and other forms of residual waste treatment (excluding thermal treatment)

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8, WP9, WP10, WP5 and/or WP4 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 49

Land at Old Lindgreat Site, Harfreys Road, Great Yarmouth

processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, household waste recycling centre, and/or waste transfer

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than one hectare in size
  • The estimated site throughput is less than 50,000tpa
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4, WP5 and/or WP7 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 66

Land at Harfreys Road, Harfreys Industrial state, Great Yarmouth

household waste recycling centre, or for processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, inert waste recycling, and/or waste transfer

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4, WP5 and/or WP7 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 70

Land at Town Lands, Harfrey's Industrial Estate, Great Yarmouth

waste recycling and processing, and wood shredding

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is in existing waste management use.
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 05

Land at Estuary Road, King's Lynn

processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing, thermal treatment and other forms of residual waste treatment

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP5 and/or WP10 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 25

Land off East Winch Road / Mill Drove, Middleton

Inert landfill

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The estimated annual input to the site is less than 50,000 tonnes
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP11 and site allocation policy MIN 06 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 36

Land at Blackborough End landfill site, Mill Drove, Middleton

temporary uses comprising composting, processing of recyclables (materials recovery facility), inert waste recycling and/or waste transfer

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • The site is in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8, WP4 and/or WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 40

Land off Mill Drove, Blackborough End

Inert landfill and inert waste recycling

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4 and WP11 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 37

Land at Feltwell landfill site, Lodge Road, Feltwell

Temporary composting

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The proposal is for a temporary use of land
  • The site has an existing waste management use as a landfill site.
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP8 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 45

Land off the B1454, Docking Common, Docking

composting

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than one hectare in size
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP8 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 65

Land at the Willows Business Park, Saddlebow, King's Lynn

composting, recycling/processing, anaerobic digestion, thermal treatment and other forms of residual waste treatment

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • Norfolk County Council as the landowner of the site is no longer promoting the site for thermal treatment of waste.
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8, WP9, WP5 and/or WP10 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 30

Land at Folgate Road, Lyngate Industrial Estate, North Walsham

composting, processing of recyclables, mixed waste processing and/or waste transfer

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8 and/or WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 94

Land off Folgate Road and Cornish Way, North Walsham

Composting or anaerobic digestion

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • The majority of this site is in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP8 or WP9 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 90

Land at 49 Hurricane Way, Norwich

Recycling centre

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than one hectare in size
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 31

Costessey Transfer Station, Longwater Business Park, Costessey

Residual waste treatment (excluding thermal treatment)

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is in existing waste management use
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP10 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 58

Land at Longwater Industrial Estate, Costessey

Processing of recyclables and/or inert waste recycling

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site is less than 1 hectare in size
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policies WP4 and/or WP5 would be relevant to the decision-making process

WAS 33

Land at Pulham Market Transfer Station, Station Road, Tivetshall St Margaret

Household waste recycling centre

Deleted

  • Specific site allocations for waste management facilities are not required because there is sufficient existing capacity during the Plan period
  • The site proposal is estimated to have a throughput of less than 50,000 tpa
  • If a planning application was to be submitted for this proposal, then criteria-based policy WP7 would be relevant to the decision-making process

Appendix 4 - Development excluded from safeguarding provisions

In accordance with Policies WP17, MP10 and MP11, Local Planning Authorities in Norfolk should consult Norfolk County Council on planning applications within Minerals Consultation Areas and Waste Consultation Areas.

It is neither practicable nor necessary for consultation to occur on all developments proposed through planning applications. Therefore, it is proposed to restrict the type of developments requiring consultation to those with significant potential for affecting the future use of areas and sites referred to above.

The following developments will be excluded from the consultation process:

  1. Proposals for minor infilling of development in towns and villages within the defined settlement limits identified in adopted local development plan documents

2. Applications for householder development including:

Construction of a replacement dwelling where the new dwelling occupies the same or similar footprint to the building being replaced;

Minor extensions to existing dwellings or properties where they lie within the immediate curtilage;

Proposals for the provision of incidental and non-habitable structures lying within the curtilage of an existing dwelling (such as driveways, garages, carparks and hard standing).

3. Advertisement applications

4. Applications related to existing permissions, such as reserved matters, or for minor amendments to current permissions.

5. Applications for new or improved accesses.

6. Applications for listed building consent or Conservation Area consent

7. 'Minor' extensions/alterations to existing buildings

8. Applications for 'temporary' buildings, structures or uses (for up to five years)

9. Proposals for the erection of agricultural buildings immediately adjacent to an existing working farmstead.

10. Proposals for 'minor' works such as fencing or bus shelters

11. Proposals for the demolition of a residential or other building

12. Extensions to existing settlements of no greater than 2 hectares, unless the extension is within 250 metres of a safeguarded minerals or waste site, or 400 metres of a safeguarded water recycling centre.

Appendix 5 - Safeguarded mineral infrastructure - railheads and wharfs (December 2021)

District

Operator and site address

Facility

Mineral type

King's Lynn and West Norfolk

Sibelco UK Ltd

Station Road, Leziate, King's Lynn, PE32 1EJ

Railhead

Silica Sand

Norwich

Tarmac Trading Ltd

Old Station Yard, Trowse, Norwich, NR1 2EG

Railhead

Crushed Rock

Great Yarmouth

Silverton Aggregates Ltd

Palgrave Wharf, Great Yarmouth, NR31 0JJ

Wharf

Crushed Rock

Appendix 6 - Safeguarded mineral extraction sites by district (December 2021)

District

Town or Parish

Operator and site address

Mineral Type

Breckland

Beeston With Bittering & Stanfield

East Anglian Stone Ltd

Punch Farm Quarry, Watery Lane, Litcham

sand and gravel

Breckland

Beeston With Bittering & Longham

McLeod Aggregates Ltd

Bittering / Longham Quarry, Reed Lane, Longham, Dereham

sand and gravel

Breckland

Beetley

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

East Bilney Quarry, Rawhall Lane, East Bilney, Dereham

sand and gravel

Breckland

Carbrooke

Four Leaf Enterprises Ltd

Carbrooke Quarry, Mill Lane, Carbooke

sand and gravel

Breckland

Carbrooke

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Carbrooke Quarry, Summer Lane, Carbrooke

sand and gravel

Breckland

Newton by Castle Acre

Needham Chalks (HAM) Ltd

Castle Acre Quarry, Dunham Road, Castle Acre, Swaffham

chalk

Broadland

Buxton With Lammas

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Mayton Wood Quarry, Little Hautbois, Coltishall

sand and gravel

Broadland

Horstead With Stanninghall

Longwater Gravel Co Ltd

Horstead Quarry, Buxton Road, Horstead

sand and gravel

Broadland

Horstead With Stanninghall

Tarmac Trading Ltd

Stanninghall Quarry, Norwich Road, Horstead

sand and gravel

Broadland

Spixworth

Tarmac Trading Ltd

Spixworth Quarry, Church Lane, Spixworth

sand and gravel

Great Yarmouth

Burgh Castle

Folkes Plant & Aggregates Ltd

Welcome Pit, Butt Lane, Burgh Castle, Great Yarmouth

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Congham

West Norfolk Lime Ltd

Hillington Chalk Quarry, Grimston Road, Hillington, King's Lynn

chalk

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

East Rudham

Longwater Gravel Co Ltd

Coxford Abbey Quarry, Docking Road, Syderstone, Fakenham

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

East Winch

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Land East of Mill Drove, Blackborough End, King's Lynn

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

East Winch

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Land east of Mill Drove, Blackborough End, King's Lynn

carstone

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

East Winch & Leziate

Sibelco UK Ltd

Grandcourt Farm Quarry, Leziate Works, Station Road, Leziate, King's Lynn

Silica sand

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Feltwell

L P Pallett Quarry (Feltwell) Ltd

Feltwell Quarry, Lodge Road, Feltwell, Thetford

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Middleton & North Runcton

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Setch Road, Middleton, King's Lynn

clay

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Middleton

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Land west of Mill Drove, Blackborough End, King's Lynn

carstone

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Middleton

William George Sand and Gravel Ltd

Land off Mill Drove, Blackborough End, King's Lynn

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Pentney

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Pentney Quarry, Abbey Road, Pentney

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Snettisham

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Snettisham Quarry, Norton Hill, Snettisham

Carstone

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Tottenhill & Watlington

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Watlington Quarry, Watlington Road, Tottenhill

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

West Dereham

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Crimplesham Quarry, Ashcraft Farm, Main Road, Crimplesham

sand and gravel

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Wormegay

None (inactive site)

Park Farm, Wormegay, King's Lynn

sand and gravel

North Norfolk

Beeston Regis

Norfolk Gravel Ltd

Briton's Lane, Beeston Regis, Sheringham

sand and gravel

North Norfolk

East Beckham

Gresham Gravel Ltd

East Beckham Quarry, Holt Road, Upper Sheringham

sand and gravel

North Norfolk

Holt

Breedon Group

Holt Quarry, Hunworth Road, Hotl

sand and gravel

North Norfolk

Stody

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Briston Stody Estate, Breck Farm, Stody

sand and gravel

South Norfolk

Caistor St Edmund

Needham Chalks (HAM) Ltd

Norwich Road, Caister St Edmund, Norwich

Chalk

South Norfolk

Earsham

Earsham Gravels Ltd

Earsham Quarry, Bath Hills Road, Earsham

sand and gravel

South Norfolk

Easton

Breedon Group

Costessey Quarry, Alex Moorhouse Way, Longwater Industrial Estate, Costessey

sand and gravel

South Norfolk

Kirby Cane

The Lyndon Pallett Group Ltd

Yarmouth Road, Kirby Cane, Bungay

sand and gravel

South Norfolk

Norton Subcourse

Breedon Group

Norton Subcourse Quarry, Loddon Road, Hales

sand and gravel

South Norfolk

Stoke Holy Cross

Tarmac Trading Ltd

Mangreen Quarry, Ipswich Road, Swardeston, Norwich

sand and gravel

South Norfolk

Wymondham

Longwater Gravel Co Ltd

Wymondham Quarry, Stanfield Road, Wymondham

sand and gravel

Appendix 7 - Safeguarded waste management sites by district (December 2021)

District

Town or Parish

Operator

Main Waste Operation

Breckland

Attleborough

Anglian Demolition & Asbestos Ltd

Transfer / Treatment

Breckland

Attleborough

Attleborough AD Plant Ltd

Anaerobic Digestion

Breckland

Besthorpe

Baldwin Skip Hire Ltd

Transfer

Breckland

Bridgham

Fibrophos Ltd

Transfer

Breckland

Carbrooke

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Inert recycling

Breckland

Carlton Rode

None

Composting (inactive)

Breckland

Cranworth

FCC Environment (UK) Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Breckland

Hockering

Norman Wenn Skip Hire

Transfer/Treatment

Breckland

Hockering

Pips Skips

Transfer/Treatment

Breckland

Longham

McLeod Aggregates Ltd

Inert recycling

Breckland

Stow Bedon

R Childerhouse

Inert recycling

Breckland

Thetford

FCC Environment (UK) Ltd

HWRC

Breckland

Thetford

Fibrophos Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Breckland

Thetford

Viridor Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Breckland

Weston Longville

TMA Bark Supplies

Composting

Breckland

Wretham

Viridor Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Broadland

Attlebridge

Biffa Waste Services

Non-hazardous landfill (in aftercare)

Broadland

Aylsham

Aylsham Plant Hire Ltd

Inert recycling

Broadland

Aylsham

Norse Environmental Waste Services Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Broadland

Buxton With Lammas

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Inert recycling

Broadland

Cantley

British Sugar PLC

Inert landfill

Broadland

Horsford

M & C Skip Hire and AKS

Transfer/Treatment

Broadland

Horsham St Faith & Newton St Faith

Norse Environmental Waste Services Ltd

HWRC

Broadland

Lenwade (Morton On The Hill)

European Metal Recycling Ltd

Metal recycling

Broadland

Marsham

None

Composting

Broadland

Rackheath

PSH Environmental Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Great Yarmouth

Belton With Browston

E E Green & Son

Inert recycling

Great Yarmouth

Burgh Castle

Folkes Plant & Aggregates Ltd

Inert recycling

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

E E Green & Son

Inert recycling

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

East Coast Waste Recycling

Transfer/Treatment

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

Enviroco Ltd

Transfer

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

European Metal Recycling Ltd

Metal recycling

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

Folkes Plant & Aggregates Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Great Yarmouth

Great Yarmouth

M T Skips

Transfer/Treatment

Great Yarmouth

West Caister

Norfolk County Council

Transfer/Treatment

Great Yarmouth

West Caister

Norse Environmental Waste Services Ltd

HWRC

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Bawsey

P Bacon Recycling Ltd

Metal recycling

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Feltwell

FCC Environmental (UK) Ltd

Non-hazardous landfill (inactive)

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Hockwold Cum Wilton

Freedom Recycling Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

King's Lynn

Norse Environmental Waste Services Ltd

HWRC

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

King's Lynn

Norse Environmental Waste Services Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Methwold

EFFG Woodlark

Anaerobic digestion

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Middleton

FCC Environment (UK) Ltd

Non-hazardous landfill

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Middleton

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Inert recycling

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Middleton

Middleton Aggregates Ltd

Inert landfill

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Snettisham

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Inert recycling and landfill

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

South Wootton

Greenworld Sales Ltd

Composting

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Wereham

British Sugar PLC

Soil recycling

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Wereham

British Sugar PLC

Composting

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

West Dereham

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Inert landfill

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

West Dereham

Mick George Ltd (Frimstone)

Inert recycling

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

West Dereham

Glazewing Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

North Norfolk

Beeston Regis

Carter Concrete Ltd

Inert storage

North Norfolk

Briston

Morrissey Builders Ltd

Inert recycling

North Norfolk

Holt

Breedon Group

Inert recycling

North Norfolk

Letheringsett With Glandford

Glaven Pits Ltd

Inert recycling

North Norfolk

North Walsham

Mr M Drury

Transfer/Treatment

North Norfolk

Tattersett

TP9 Limited

Tyre baling

North Norfolk

Worstead

Carl Bird Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

South Norfolk

Bracon Ash

Greencomp

Composting

South Norfolk

Costessey

FCC Environment (UK) Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

South Norfolk

Costessey

Jays Total Waste Management Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

South Norfolk

Costessey

Norse Environmental Waste Services Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

South Norfolk

Costessey

Veolia ES Ltd

Transfer

South Norfolk

Ketteringham

M W White Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

South Norfolk

Kirby Bedon

Anglian Water Plc

Composting

South Norfolk

Morningthorpe With Fritton

Richardson Recycling Ltd

Inert landfill

South Norfolk

Pulham Market

AR Kent & Son

Transfer/Treatment

South Norfolk

Thurlton

M Gaze & Co Ltd

Composting

South Norfolk

Tivetshall St Margaret

None

Transfer/Treatment (inactive)

Norwich

Norwich

FCC Environment (UK) Ltd

Transfer/Treatment

Appendix 8 - Safeguarded Water Recycling Centres (December 2021)

All WRC are operated by Anglian Water Services Ltd

District

Town or Parish

Address

Grid reference

(XY coordinates)

Broadland

Acle

Acle WRC, Damgate Lane, Acle, Norwich, NR13 3DJ

640782, 309837

Breckland

Attleborough

Attleborough WRC, Off Long Street, Attleborough, NR17 1AW

602842, 295144

Broadland

Aylsham

Aylsham WRC, Burgh Road, Aylsham, Norwich, NR11 6AR

620638, 326813

Broadland

Belaugh

Belaugh WRC, Top Road, Belaugh, Norwich, NR12 8UX

629347, 318445

North Norfolk

Briston

Briston WRC, Hell Pit Lane, Briston, Melton Constable, NR24 2JH

607318, 331430

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Burnham Thorpe

Burnham Market WRC, John Short Lane, Burnham Market, King's Lynn, PE31 8HJ

584471, 342257

Breckland

Bylaugh

Bylaugh WRC, Bylaugh Park, Bylaugh, Dereham, NR20 4RL

603698, 318261

North Norfolk

Cley-Next-the-Sea

Cley-next-the Sea WRC, Glandford Road, Cley-next-the-sea, NR25 7TW

604671, 342381

Breckland

Dereham

Dereham WRC, Rush Meadow, East Dereham, NR19 2XR

597699, 313735

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Downham Market

Downham Market WRC, Downham Market, PE38 9GN

560627, 304200

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Feltwell

Feltwell WRC, Lenards Lane, Feltwell, IP26 4AY

570060, 290820

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Grimston

Grimston WRC, Watery Lane, Grimston, King's Lynn, PE32 1BQ

571232, 321016

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Heacham

Heacham WRC, Fenway, Heacham, King's Lynn, PE31 7LB

566747, 336313

North Norfolk

Holt and Letheringsett with Glandford

Holt WRC, Off Holt Road, Holt, NR25 6RZ

606882, 338946

North Norfolk

Horning

Horning Knackers Wood WRC, Knackers Wood, Horning, Norwich, NR12 8XU

635585, 317868

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Ingoldisthorpe

Ingoldisthorpe WRC, Shernborne Road, Ingoldisthorpe, King's Lynn, PE31 6PE

569827, 332625

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

King's Lynn

King's Lynn WRC, Clockcase Road, Clenchwarton, King's Lynn, PE34 4BZ

560349, 322174

South Norfolk

Kirby Bedon

Whitlingham WRC, Whitlingham Lane, Trowse, Norwich, NR14 8TZ

627670, 307311

North Norfolk

Knapton

Mundesley-Knapton Road WRC, Knapton Road, Mundesley, NR11 8LA

631045, 335582

Breckland

Little Cressingham

Great Cressingham WRC, Priory Drove, Great Cressingham, Thetford, IP25 6NJ

588596, 300095

North Norfolk

Ludham

Ludham WRC, Walton Hall, Catfield Road, Ludham, NR29 5QU

638947, 319480

Breckland

Mattishall

Mattishall WRC, Stone Road, Mattishall, NR20 3PG

602577, 312086

South Norfolk

Morningthorpe and Fritton

Hempnall WRC, Field Lane, Hempnall, Norwich, NR15 2QX

623212, 294598

North Norfolk

North Walsham

North Walsham WRC, Marshgate, North Walsham, NR28 9LG

629626, 330752

Breckland

Old Buckenham

Old Buckenham WRC, Abbey Road, Old Buckenham, Attleborough, NR17 1PZ

606143, 290517

South Norfolk

Poringland

Poringland WRC, Dove Lane, Poringland, Norwich, NR14 7ND

628334, 300894

North Norfolk

Pudding Norton

Fakenham WRC, Dereham Road, Fakenham, NR21 7NA

591942, 328913

Breckland

Quidenham

East Harling WRC, East Harling, Eccles, NR16 2JR

601057, 288208

South Norfolk

Redenhall with Harleston

Harleston WRC, Works Road, Harleston, IP20 9HF

625002, 284119

Broadland

Reepham

Reepham WRC, Norwich Road, Reepham, Norwich, NR10 4NR

610446, 322659

North Norfolk

Runton

Cromer WRC, Middlebrook Way, East Runton, Cromer, NR27 9PH

620566, 341990

South Norfolk

Saxlingham Nethergate

Saxlingham WRC, Elmer's Lane, Saxlingham Nethergate, Newton Flotman, NR15 1UE

621900, 272644

South Norfolk

Sisland

Sisland (Loddon) WRC, Nursery Road, Chedgrave, Norwich, NR14 6BF

634301, 299303

Breckland

Sporle with Palgrave

Necton (Sporle) WRC, Sporle, Off A47, PE32 2EG

586203, 309232

North Norfolk

Stalham

Stalham WRC, Wayford Road, Stalham, Norwich, NR12 9LQ

635874, 325186

Breckland

Swaffham

Swaffham STW, South Pickenham Road, Swaffham, PE37 8DA

583566, 306547

South Norfolk

Swardeston

Swardeston WRC, Swardeston, Norwich, NR14 8EB

619647, 302736

South Norfolk

Tharston and Hapton

Long Stratton WRC, Picton Road, Tharston, Norwich, NR15 2YD

619301, 293594

Breckland

Thetford

Thetford STW, Thetford, IP24 1DT

585519, 283614

King's Lynn & West Norfolk

Watlington

Watlington WRC, Station Road, Watlington, King's Lynn, PE33 0JG

560328, 311875

North Norfolk

Wells-Next-the-Sea

Wells-next-the-Sea WRC, Freeman Street, Wells-next-the-Sea, NR23 1FD

591217, 344053

Great Yarmouth

West Caister

Caister WRC, Pump Lane, Caister-on-Sea, Great Yarmouth, NR30 5TE

651961, 311047

Kings Lynn & West Norfolk

West Walton

Wisbech (West Walton) WRC, West Walton, Wisbech, PE14 7EY

545974, 314296

South Norfolk

Wymondham

Wymondham WRC, Chapel Lane, Wymondham, NR18 0DL

609572, 302834

Appendix 9 – Schedule of requirements of a Minerals Infrastructure Impact Assessment (MIIA) and Waste Management Facilities Impact Assessment (WMFIA)

Minerals Infrastructure Impact Assessment and Waste Management Facilities Impact Assessment Components

Information requirements and sources

Site location, boundaries and area

  • Application site area in relation to safeguarded site(s)
  • Description of proposed development
  • Timescale of proposed development

Description of infrastructure / waste management facility potentially affected

  • Type of safeguarded facility eg wharf, rail depot, concrete batching plant, asphalt plant, recycled aggregate site, or waste management facility type
  • Type of material or waste handled / processed / supplied
  • Throughput / capacity

Potential sensitivity of proposed development as a result of the operation of existing safeguarded infrastructure or waste management facility (with or without mitigation)

  • Distance of the development from the safeguarded site at its closest point, to include the safeguarded facility and any access routes,
  • The presence of any existing buildings or other features which naturally screen the proposed development from the safeguarded facility
  • Evidence addressing the ability of vehicle traffic to access, operate within and vacate the safeguarded development in line with extant planning permission
  • Impacts on the proposed development in relation to: noise, dust, odour, traffic, visual, light.

Potential impact of proposed development on the effective working of the safeguarded infrastructure or waste management facility

  • Loss of capacity – none, partial or total,
  • Potential constraint on operation of facility – none or partial

Mitigation measures to be included by the proposed development to reduce impact from existing safeguarded infrastructure or waste management facility

  • External and internal design & orientation e.g., landscaping; living and sleeping areas facing away from the facility,
  • Fabric and features e.g., acoustic screening & insulation; non-opening windows; active ventilation.

Conclusions

  • How the MIIA / WMFIA informed the final layout of the proposed development.
  • Potential sensitivity of proposed development to effects of operation of the safeguarded infrastructure/ facility and how these can be mitigated satisfactorily; or

If there is a loss of site or capacity or constraint on operations, or

Mineral infrastructure / waste management facility can be re-located or provided elsewhere.

An MIIA or WMFIA is expected to be evidence based and informed by quantified information. It is recognised that the requirements of an MIIA or WMFIA may be addressed through other evidence-based documents, such as those addressing transport, odour and noise issues. In these instances, it would be acceptable for the MIIA or WMFIA to signpost to the relevant section of complementary evidence supporting the planning application.

Appendix 10 - Implementation of Mineral Safeguarding Areas and Mineral Consultation Areas Policy

A10.1 General process to be followed for non-mineral applications on Mineral Safeguarding Areas / Mineral Consultation Areas (MSAs/MCAs)

A10.1.1 This appendix should be read in conjunction with Mineral and Waste Local Plan policy MP11 and its associated supporting text.

A10.1.2 Where land in an MSA/MCA are proposed for allocation through the Local Plan process, the Mineral Planning Authority (MPA) would welcome early engagement with the Local Planning Authority (LPA) to understand how mineral safeguarding matters have been addressed in the site selection process ahead of any formal consultation procedure.

A10.1.3 Where any proposed allocations or applications for large-scale multi-phase built developments, such as sustainable urban extensions or garden towns, fall with an MSA/MCA; full consideration of mineral safeguarding issues should be investigated early in the process. Non-mineral development may not be planned to come forward for several years, providing the opportunity for more comprehensive mineral extraction to take place well in advance of such development. Such extraction proposals are likely to be County Matters in two-tier areas given that any application would need to be a standalone minerals application rather than linked to the primary built development proposal. Under this scenario, two applications would be required to be submitted: one to the LPA and one to the MPA.

A10.1.4 Consultation by the applicant with local mineral operators can help to determine any commercial interest in undertaking prior extraction of the resource based on its quantity, quality and viability of prior extraction, both as a standalone activity and in the context of having to restore the site to facilitate the primary development.

A10.1.5 As with any planning applications, such applications may be refused or granted permission. In addition, consideration should be given to whether planning permission is required for the acceptance of the mineral at a processing plant at an existing mineral working as receipt of this material may extend the life of the existing working.

A10.1.6 For clarity and consistency, Norfolk's LPAs should identify any mineral and waste safeguarded sites on their own Policies Map for their relevant administrative area.

A10.1.7 It is important that Mineral Safeguarding issues are recognised on a site as early in the planning process as possible. The potential for prior extraction should be recognised and built into the master-planning process. A comprehensive design process that recognises where viable mineral resources occur may influence the design of a site, especially in relation to site topography and sustainable drainage system design.

A10.2 When a Mineral Resource Assessment (MRA) is required (Policy MP11)

A10.2.1 Appendix 4 of this document contains a list of proposed development which would be exempt from the requirements of M&W Local Plan Policy MP11. If a prospective development does not fall within these exemptions applicants/proposers should consult the mapping of MSAs either through the interactive mineral resources map, or the printed Policies Map.

A10.2.2 If the redline application area of the prospective development falls wholly or partly within an MSA then the applicant should follow the process for preparing an MRA set out below. If an application which is exempt from the requirements of Policy MP11 is submitted to Norfolk County Council, in its capacity as the MPA, for a mineral safeguarding response, no response will normally be sent to either the LPA or applicant.

A10.2.3 Where the policy tests and thresholds of Policy MP11 are met, whether it be the preparation of a Local Plan, Masterplan or planning application, the need for a MRA is expected to form part of pre-application discussions between the relevant LPA, the prospective developer and/or the MPA as relevant. The MPA requires an MRA to be undertaken as soon as practical, and at such a time that it can shape and inform the early stages of a Master Plan/planning application.

A10.2.4 The Norfolk County Council (as the MPA) is keen for prior extraction not to be seen or viewed as an undue barrier for development coming forward. In this respect, it is stressed that potential applicants should undertake an MRA (when required) as soon as possible and seek to get agreement on the conclusions of this with the MPA.

A10.2.5 For the majority of non-mineral and non-waste developments (excluding large developments as mentioned previously) the LPA will be the district or borough council. Any prior extraction of mineral to meet the requirements of Policy MP11 is likely to be considered ancillary to the proposed non-mineral development, in the same way as other construction works such as sustainable drainage systems and bunds.

A10.2.6 An inadequate or absent MRA when required by policy, or any other failure to demonstrate compliance with safeguarding policy, would likely be considered by the MPA as being out of conformity with the Development Plan as it would be contrary to Policy MP11, and inconsistent with national policy and guidance; and should be advertised as a departure application. In this instance, Norfolk County Council, in its capacity as the MPA would also be likely to be raise a statutory objection. These would be material considerations of considerable weight in the determination of the application by the LPA.

A10.2.7 In that respect, it is considered that LPAs should include the need for MRAs within their Validation Checklists and highlight their need in pre-application discussions.

A10.2.8 Each response from the MPA will take into account factors such as the mineral importance of the MSA resource, the particular use of a safeguarded mineral site, the nature of the proposed development, whether viability has been properly assessed and the compatibility or degree of conflict. Any mitigation which could address any adverse impacts would also be relevant.

A10.3 The Scope and Level of Detail of a Mineral Resource Assessment

A10.3.1 The general process below provides an outline of how prospective developers should address safeguarding issues related to MSAs. This advice is general in nature and may be supplemented or amended by specific advice on individual sites. It is recommended that prospective applicants engage in discussions regarding safeguarding with the MPA early in the planning process.

A10.3.2 The NPPF (paragraph 212) is clear that LPAs should not normally permit other development proposals in MSAs if it might constrain potential future use for mineral working. However, the prior extraction of these minerals would mean that implementation of the proposed non-mineral development would no longer constrain any such potential future use for mineral working, and therefore this NPPF principle would be satisfied.

A10.3.3 If a proposed development is located on a MSA then there are two main issues to be addressed in formulating a safeguarding response:

  • the applicant should carry out investigations to identify whether the resource is viable for mineral extraction, and
  • if the mineral resource is viable, the applicant considers whether it could be extracted economically prior to development taking place.

A10.4 Ground investigations and testing

A10.4.1 Applicants may find it useful as part of their discussions with the MPA to provide a draft trial pit/borehole location plan which can be agreed with the MPA at an early stage. This will ensure that the subsequent investigations and assessment are derived from an appropriate distribution of trial pits/boreholes. This would help in preventing additional work later in the application process as the result of an objection from the MPA.

A10.4.2 Either the Environmental Statement or, in the case of non-EIA applications, the Planning Statement should address relevant mineral safeguarding issues for the proposed development, through the inclusion of a Mineral Resource Assessment.

A10.4.3 The mineral deposits found in Norfolk are highly variable, and the data used to define the MSAs is general in nature. Therefore, site investigations are required to prove the exact location of any deposits, assess the quality of any mineral and the depth of any overburden present. These factors principally determine the viability of the site.

A10.4.4 The nature of any potential prior mineral extraction would be likely to be shallow in comparison with dedicated sand and gravel workings, because of the intended final use of a site for non-mineral development. There would be differences in the likely depth of extraction depending on several factors. These factors may include whether the proposed non-mineral use of the site would be residential or non-residential, as well as the topography of the site and whether grading or levelling of the site is required for the proposed non-mineral use. There may be opportunities for more general mineral extraction in areas proposed for industrial uses, where construction at a lower level would reduce any potential amenity impacts from these buildings, such as reducing any visual intrusion from the scale of the buildings.

A10.4.5 The scope of the MRA, including a schedule of proposed borehole locations, should be agreed with the MPA before commencement. It is expected that the MRA be carried out by a competent person, such as a minerals surveyor. Information must be representative of the whole site as reliance on limited data, for example poor borehole log coverage, is likely to result in an inaccurate assessment being undertaken. It is acceptable to utilise existing borehole information where this exists, but this may be required to be supplemented by additional borehole logs to provide the required level of site-specific detail.

A10.4.6 The MPA will not always require prior extraction to take place across the full extent of the development site, nor to the full depth of the resource. However, the maximum amount of extraction considered viable in the context of the development is encouraged to minimise the amount of resource sterilised.

A10.4.7 The scope and level of detail of a MRA will be influenced by the specific characteristics of the site's location and its geology, as well as the nature of the development being applied for. Therefore, it is considered that mineral investigations, either as boreholes or trial pits to a depth of 2.5m-3.5m, would be appropriate for residential developments. This range of depths has been used for investigations on other proposed residential developments in Norfolk. For non-residential developments a greater depth may be appropriate depending on the likely founding and groundworks depths.

A10.4.8 The spacing of trial pits and/or boreholes is important to ensure that a thorough assessment of the mineral resource across a site can be made. An initial spacing of approximately 100m-150m centre to centre should be considered, with additional locations if required to determine the extent of deposits on site.

A10.4.9 Logs for trial pits and/or boreholes should be completed to an accepted industry standard, such as the Pan‐European Standard for Reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral Resources and Reserves (PERC) Standard, and must note the depth of the water table if this a significant consideration in determining viability.

A10.4.10 The boreholes/trial pits for mineral investigations could be linked to the investigations normally required as part of the geotechnical study to support a Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) which would normally be to a similar depth.

A10.4.11 The assessment of the onsite mineral resources would require the addition of Particle Size Distribution (PSD) tests on batches of any sand and gravel bearing deposits recovered, although this is often carried out for the FRA. Assessment of the results of the Particle Size Distribution testing should refer to material class types in Table 6/1 of the Manual of Contract Documents for Highway Works: vol. 1: Specification for Highway Works Series 600, to identify potential suitability for use in the construction phases.

A10.5 Concluding on the Findings of the Minerals Resource Assessment

A10.5.1 An MRA is expected to be evidence based and informed by quantified information based on the site investigations, testing and assessment. If no viable deposits were found at the depths likely to be considered appropriate there would only need to be a short statement to this effect and the submission of borehole logs and PSD results as evidence.

A10.5.2 If mineral investigations were to prove a viable deposit, an assessment would be required to determine the quantities of material which could be recovered, this should make use of details of the layout of the proposed development. The MRA should provide conclusions on the practicality of prior extraction, which should be made in the context of the viability of the non-mineral development that is creating the sterilisation risk. Assessing the practicality of prior extraction as a standalone operation is to assess a false premise.

A10.5.3 The conclusion should consider the environs surrounding the site including the presence or absence of constraints to prior extraction, such as existing residential development. However, in doing so it should recognise that generally the shallow nature of prior extraction, or the reuse of material extracted as part of the groundworks is likely to be less than would normally be the case for a commercial mineral working. It is considered that, in general, conditions and mitigation measures could reduce impacts to the levels likely for any other part of the construction project; and should propose mitigation such as buffers accordingly.

A10.5.4 The assessment will need to consider whether there are areas of the site where viable mineral resources exist which would not be built on as part of the proposed development and from which mineral could not be extracted. For example, areas of mature woodland which would remain as part of the development.

A10.5.5 The National Planning Practice Guidance provides detail on the methodology and mitigation for noise and dust assessments for mineral workings. This would be a matter for the detailed assessment at the planning application stage.

A10.5.6 The methodology for the practical implementation of prior extraction could take the form of a Materials Management Plan – Minerals (MMP-M). For areas of construction, the MMP-M will estimate the potential quantities and types of materials that would be potentially recoverable from areas such as groundworks, sustainable drainage systems, and landscaping areas.

A10.5.7 The aim of the MMP-M should be, as a minimum, to balance as far as possible the mineral recovered from these operations with site construction activity which would consume aggregate, such as road sub-bases, granular fill, and bunding required etc.

A10.5.8 The MMP-M should consider the extent to which onsite material recovered would meet the specifications required for the construction phases. There is usually potential for significant amounts of material recovered to be reused on site. However, there is likely to be a need for some grades of material from traditional sources. There is also likely to be material recovered from the site which is 'Out of Grade' for onsite use could be sent to the supplier of aggregate as a return run, where it could be processed and used; this has been an approach taken by other developments in Norfolk.

A10.5.9 There are benefits in terms of sustainability which could accrue from the use of onsite materials, and there may be cost benefits resulting from the reuse of onsite resources in terms of reduced demand for import and export of material, and the associated costs of transport.

A10.5.10 On some sites where more general extraction takes place, there may be opportunities for a net export of material, this would be encouraged subject to no unacceptable impacts after appropriate mitigation measures are taken into account. The MMP-M should contain measures to ensure that the export of such materials is recorded, and such records are available to the LPA/MPA for monitoring purposes.

A10.6 Additional requirements for sites underlain by silica sand resources

A10.6.1 The above process is sufficient for those sites underlain by sand and gravel and carstone safeguarding areas. Sand and gravel and carstone are relatively low value aggregate minerals which have local to regional importance. However, the silica sand found in Norfolk is used in industrial processes such as glassmaking. It is a high value mineral of national importance and is scarce in England. Therefore, the potential sterilisation of silica sand resources has a far greater sensitivity than for aggregate minerals.

A10.6.2 Site investigations on sites where the underlying mineral resources are silica sand will need to be far more detailed. Boreholes should be used to prove the depth of the mineral resource. The location of boreholes should be placed across the site to ensure that a comprehensive picture of the resource underlying the whole of the site is obtained. Samples from various depths in each borehole will be necessary to ensure identification of silica sand deposits within the resource which are of suitable specifications for industrial uses. It vital that proposers of such sites engage with the MPA at an early stage, and that site investigations are carried out as part of the preliminary work in preparing an application or site allocation.

A10.6.3 As part of these site investigations, contact should be made with only silica sand operator in Norfolk (Sibelco UK Ltd), as they will be able to determine whether onsite resources are of commercial importance. If following investigations, testing and communication with the mineral operator it is determined that the silica sand does not meet the specifications for industrial uses, then it should be treated in the same manner as for aggregate minerals. If the silica sand resource is proved to be of importance as an industrial mineral, the MRA will need to take into account the national importance of the mineral resource in determining the quantity of mineral that will be recovered from the site. The MRA should seek to balance the relative importance of these valuable and scarce mineral resources with the need for the non-mineral development. In determining non-mineral applications on sites with such proven silica sand resources the LPA must take into account NPPF paragraph 212 in coming to a decision. The MPA would expect that it would be necessary for the non-mineral development to be of at least national importance in order to override mineral safeguarding of commercially viable silica sand.


Appendix 11 – Forecast Waste Arisings

Year

Local Authority Collected Waste

('000 tonnes)

Commercial and industrial waste

('000 tonnes)

Inert waste

('000 tonnes)

Hazardous waste

('000 tonnes)

Total Forecast waste arisings

('000 tonnes)

2019/20

408

1,539

1,100

90

3,137

2020/21

413

1,560

1,100

90

3,163

2021/22

418

1,581

1,100

90

3,189

2022/23

424

1,602

1,100

90

3,216

2023/24

429

1,624

1,100

90

3,243

2024/25

434

1,645

1,100

90

3,269

2025/26

439

1,668

1,100

90

3,297

2026/27

444

1,690

1,100

90

3,324

2027/28

450

1,713

1,100

90

3,353

2028/29

455

1,736

1,100

90

3,381

2029/30

460

1,760

1,100

90

3,410

2030/31

465

1,783

1,100

90

3,438

2031/32

471

1,807

1,100

90

3,468

2032/33

476

1,838

1,100

90

3,504

2033/34

481

1,857

1,100

90

3,528

2034/35

486

1,882

1,100

90

3,558

2035/36

491

1,907

1,100

90

3,588

2036/37

497

1,933

1,100

90

3,620

2037/38

502

1,959

1,100

90

3,651

Appendix 12 - Glossary

Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs): Areas designated by local authorities because they are not likely to achieve national air quality objectives by the relevant deadlines.

Aftercare: The treatment of land for a period (usually five years) following restoration to bring the land to the required standard so that it is fit for its agreed after-use.

Afteruse: the use (usually for agriculture, forestry or amenity) that land is put to once restored following mineral working, or temporary waste management operations such as landfill.

Aggregates: Materials such as sand and gravel and crushed rock, used in the construction industry for purposes such as concrete, mortar or roadstone.

Agricultural waste: Waste that is specifically generated by agricultural activities. It includes manure and other wastes from farms, poultry houses and slaughter houses; harvest waste, and pesticides.

Amenity: a positive element or elements that contribute to the overall character or enjoyment of an area.

Anaerobic Digestion: Anaerobic digestion is the biological treatment of biodegradable organic waste in the absence of oxygen, utilising microbial activity to break down the waste in a controlled environment. Anaerobic digestion results in the generation of:

● Biogas, which is rich in methane and can be used to generate heat and/or electricity;

● Fibre, (or digestate) which is nutrient rich and can potentially be used as a soil conditioner; and

● Liquor, which can potentially be used as a liquid fertiliser.

Ancient Woodland: An area of woodland which has had a continuous history of tree cover since at least 1600.

Appropriate Assessment: Directive 92/43/EEC on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Flora requires an Appropriate Assessment to be undertaken to assess the impacts of a land-use plan against the conservation objectives of a European Site and to ascertain whether it would adversely affect the integrity of that site.

Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB): Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty designated under the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 for the purposes of preserving and enhancing their natural beauty.

Area of Search: areas where knowledge of mineral resources may be less certain but within which planning permission may be granted, particularly if there is a potential shortfall in supply. If it is not possible to designate Specific Sites, or Preferred Areas, the alternative way to plan for the steady and adequate supply of minerals is to designate Areas of Search.

Biodegradable waste: any waste that is capable of undergoing natural decomposition, such as food and garden waste, paper and cardboard.

Biodiversity: The variety of all life on earth (mammals, birds, fish, invertebrates, plants etc).

Borrow pit: A temporary mineral working to supply material for a specific construction project.

Brownfield land Also known as "previously-developed land". Land which is or was occupied by a permanent structure, including the curtilage of the developed land (although it should not be assumed that the whole of the curtilage should be developed) and any associated fixed surface infrastructure. This excludes: land that is or has been occupied by agricultural or forestry buildings; land that has been developed for minerals extraction or waste disposal by landfill purposes where provision for restoration has been made through development control procedures; land in built-up areas such as private residential gardens, parks, recreation grounds and allotments; and land that was previously-developed but where the remains of the permanent structure or fixed surface structure have blended into the landscape in the process of time.

Buffer: Buffers are areas of land within the allocation which would remain unworked for mineral extraction to mitigate potential impacts (for example, on amenity, landscape or ecology). Where a buffer is included in a site allocations policy or map it is 'indicative' and is intended only to illustrate where assessment at this stage has indicated that there may be impacts which, in principle, are likely to require buffers to mitigate them. The exact distances and coverage of any buffer, if required, would be determined following assessment of the detail of potential impacts as part of any future planning application.

Carstone: Carstone is a ferrunginous brown sandstone quarried in West Norfolk. It is used primarily for construction fill. When the iron content is high it can meet higher specifications. Traditionally in West Norfolk it was used as a building material.

Climate change: Changes in climate resulting from an increase in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere (e.g. emissions from transport and industry), global changes to land surface, such as from deforestation, and an increase in atmospheric concentrations of aerosols.

Composting: A process where organic wastes (such as garden and kitchen waste) are broken down aerobically (in the presence of air) to create a product that can be applied to land to improve soil structure and enrich the nutrient content of the soil.

Conservation Area: An area designated by the Local Planning Authority under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 as possessing special architectural or historical interest.

Construction, Demolition and Excavation waste (CD&E): CD&E waste can be in the form of certain types of: Construction wastes (e.g. surplus supplies of materials specifically required for a single project as well as waste originating from site preparation), Demolition wastes (e.g. used material resulting from demolition activities); or Excavation wastes (e.g. usually consisting of soils and stones which cannot be used beneficially, such as from tunnelling operations, the soil component may not be inert).

Commercial and industrial waste (C&I): Waste from shops, industrial and business premises.

County Wildlife Site: A site of local importance for wildlife. Outside SSSIs, County Wildlife Sites are the best sites for wildlife in Norfolk. Sites are designated using stringent criteria, by a committee composed of the Norfolk Wildlife Trust, Norfolk County Council, Natural England, the Norfolk Biological Records Centre, and the Norfolk Biodiversity Partnership.

Cumulative Impact: The combined impacts of a number of developments on the environment, amenity, health, traffic etc.

Development Management: The process through which the Council determines whether a proposal for development should be granted planning permission, taking into account the development plan and any other material considerations.

Development Plan: Statutory documents described in the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 (as amended) that set out the planning policies and proposals for the development and use of land. Decisions on planning applications must conform to the Development Plan, unless material considerations indicate otherwise.

Development Plan Documents: A term brought in by the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004. They set out spatial planning policies and proposals for an area. Development Plan Documents are also referred to as Local Plans.

Disposal: Waste disposal operations include: deposit into or onto land (e.g. landfill), incineration, permanent storage, treatment operations where the final compound or mixture will be disposed of.

Ecological network: Areas of semi-natural habitat that are linked by corridors or "stepping stones", and thus enable wildlife to move through the wider landscape.

Energy from Waste (EfW): Utilising the embodied energy of waste materials to generate electricity and heat through direct combustion or indirect combustion of biogas.

Energy recovery: The generation of heat and power from the thermal treatment of waste, the production of fuels from other forms of treatment and the combustion of landfill gas and gas from anaerobic digestion to create electricity.

Examination: The Local Plan will be subject to an independent examination by an independent planning inspector. The recommendations in the Inspectors report will inform the final adopted version, but are no longer legally-binding.

Gasification: A process whereby carbon based wastes are heated in the presence of air or steam to produce fuel-rich gases.

Geodiversity: The variety of rocks, minerals, fossils, soils and landforms, together with the natural processes which shape the landscape.

Geomorphology: The study of landforms and the formative processes that shape the physical landscape.

Green Infrastructure: A network of multi-functional green space, urban and rural, which is capable of delivering a wide range of environmental and quality of life benefits for local communities.

Greenhouse gas: Gases such as carbon dioxide and methane which, when their atmospheric concentrations exceed certain levels, can contribute to climate changes buy forming a barrier in the earth's atmosphere that traps the sun's heat.

Gross Value Added (GVA): the value generated by any business or organisation that produces goods or services. The calculation for GVA is: value of goods and services produced, minus the costs of production in terms of raw materials and other direct costs. It does not take into account the effects of taxation or subsidies. This can be measured across a geographical area, industry or sector, and can used as a measure of productivity and growth.

Groundwater Source Protection Zones: The Environment Agency divides groundwater source catchments into four zones. These are based on the number of days taken by any pollutant to flow to the borehole. Source Protection Zone 1 is defined as a zone within which any contamination would reach the borehole within 50 days. This applies to groundwater at and below the water table. This zone also has a minimum 50 metre protection radius around the borehole. These zones are designed to provide control over activities taking place near boreholes which could result in contamination reaching the public water supply.

Groundwater: Water within soil, sediments or rocks below the ground surface. Water contained within underground strata is referred to as an aquifer.

Habitats Regulations Assessment (Appropriate Assessment): Directive 92/43/EEC (the Habitats Directive) on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Flora requires an Appropriate Assessment to be undertaken to assess the impacts of a land-use plan against the conservation objectives of a European Site and to ascertain whether it would adversely affect the integrity of that site.

Hazardous waste: As defined by The List of Wastes Regulations 2005, eg asbestos, acids, oils, petroleum products, paint, mercury, solvents, un-depolluted end-of-life vehicles. It is waste that poses potential threats to public health or the environment (when improperly treated, stored, transported or disposed). This can be due to the quantity, concentration or characteristics of the waste. This type of waste includes elements of healthcare waste.

Heritage asset: A building, monument, site, place, area or landscape identified as having a degree of significance meriting consideration in planning decisions because of its heritage interest. Designated heritage assets include World Heritage Sites, Scheduled Monuments, Listed Buildings, Protected Wreck Sites, Registered Parks and Gardens, Registered Battlefields and Conservation Areas. Heritage assets can also be non-designated.

Historic Environment: All aspects of the environment resulting from the interaction between people and places through time, including all surviving physical remains of past human activity, whether visible, buried or submerged, and landscaped and planted or managed flora

Household waste: Household waste includes all mixed waste that is collected from households; all materials taken to local bring banks or collected at the doorstep or kerbside for recycling and composting; all waste (apart from rubble) that is taken to the County Council operated Recycling Centres; litter and street sweepings.

Household waste recycling centres: Provided by Waste Disposal Authorities as places where the public can deliver their household waste for recycling or disposal. These sites usually incorporate skips, collection areas for waste refrigeration and metal appliances, and recycling banks. Some sites have containers for materials such as waste batteries, paint, oil and wood. These facilities do not generally accept trade waste.

Incineration plant: Any stationary or mobile technical unit and equipment dedicated to the thermal treatment of waste with or without recovery of the combustion heat generated This includes the incineration by oxidation of waste as well as other thermal treatment processes such as pyrolysis, gasification or plasma processes in so far as the substances resulting from the treatment are subsequently incinerated.

Inert waste: Waste that does not undergo any significant physical, chemical or biological, transformations; does not dissolve, burn or otherwise physically or chemically react, biodegrade or adversely affect other matter with which it comes into contact in a way likely to give rise to environmental pollution or harm to human health; and, in particular, does not endanger the quality of any surface water or groundwater.

Inert waste recycling: Includes the recycling of secondary aggregates at centralised processing facilities or where the material arises. Material is delivered by skip or bulk vehicle for crushing, screening and grading for re-use. Unusable residues may be used in landfill engineering. Hardstanding is required for stockpiles of material, and for locating crushing, screening and grading machinery. Some elements of the operation and storage may be enclosed, but it is mostly undertaken in the open air.

In-Vessel Composting: The aerobic decomposition of shredded and mixed organic waste within an enclosed container, where the control systems for material degradation are fully automated. Moisture, temperature and odour can be regulated, and a stable compost can be produced much more quickly than outdoor windrow composting.

Initial Consultation: A stage of the Local Plan preparation process where community engagement is sought from individuals and organisations to inform the identification of key issues and the potential options for addressing them.

Landbank: A stock of mineral reserves with planning permission for their extraction.

Landfill: The term landfill relates to waste disposal mainly below ground level whereas landraise, also generically referred to as landfill, refers to waste disposal mainly above pre-existing ground levels. Modern landfill practice requires a significant degree of engineering in order to contain the waste, control emissions and minimise potential environmental effects. The primary by-products of landfilling, where biodegradable materials are disposed of, are landfill gas and leachate (a liquor resulting from water passing through the waste mass) and much landfill engineering is geared towards dealing with these substances. As such, landfill sites require containment lining systems and abstraction systems for both landfill gas and leachate.

Landfill gas: A by-product from the decomposition of biodegradable wastes. The gas is a mixture of up to 65% methane and 35% carbon dioxide plus trace gases and vapours.

Landscape character: A distinct and consistent pattern of elements in the landscape that makes one landscape different to another.

Leachate: A liquor resulting from water passing through the waste mass and therefore containing contaminants.

Listed building: A building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance using provisions under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. A listed building may not be demolished, extended or altered without special permission being granted by the Local Planning Authority. The Local Planning Authority must also consider if development nearby could cause adverse impacts to the listed building, and whether mitigation could address these impacts.

Local Authority Collected Waste (LACW): Waste collected from households and some business premises by local authorities, including waste from household waste recycling centres, public parks and public bins.

Local Development Scheme: Describes the Local Development Documents which the authority intends to prepare and the timetable for their preparation.

Local Plan: The plan for the future development of the local area, drawn up by the local planning authority in consultation with the community. In law this is described as the development plan documents adopted under the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 (as amended). Current core strategies or other planning policies, which under the regulations would be considered to be development plan documents, form part of the Local Plan. The term includes old policies which have been saved under the 2004 Act.

Local Planning Authority: An organisation with statutory planning powers, ie the relevant County, District, Borough or Unitary Council.

Local Transport Plan: A document produced by Local Highway Authorities that describes its transport policies and its broad implementation programme.

Materials Recycling Facility: A specialised building for separating, processing and storing recyclable materials from waste collected either separately or mixed.

Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT): A form of waste processing facility that combines a sorting facility (the 'mechanical' element) with a form of biological treatment such as composting or anaerobic digestion.

Methane: A colourless, odourless, flammable gas, formed during the decomposition of biodegradable waste.

Mineral Consultation Area: An area identified in order to ensure consultation between the relevant LPA and the Mineral Planning Authority before certain non-mineral planning applications made within the area are determined.

Mineral Safeguarding Area: An area defined by the Mineral Planning Authority to identify a mineral resource which would be subject to safeguarding to prevent unnecessary sterilisation by non-mineral developments; used in conjunction with Mineral Consultation Area.

Mineral Planning Authority: An organisation with statutory planning powers relating to minerals development, in most areas the County or Unitary Council.

Mitigation: Measures used to reduce, avoid or remedy any adverse impacts caused by development.

Mixed waste processing: Operations, primarily of a mechanical and/or biological nature, to process residual municipal waste (household or similar commercial and industrial waste). Residual waste is what is left following the separation of recyclables / food waste / green garden waste either at source or centrally. The nature of mixed waste processing operations depends on the needs of downstream waste management practices. For example, refuse derived fuel (RDF) can be produced from mixed waste and the RDF can then be used to produce heat and power. Alternatively, organic waste can be separated for biological treatment. Various physical separation and waste reduction techniques can be used, sometimes in combination. Such processes include: trommel screen (typically a tilted rotating drum used to screen waste according to size and density), shredders, RDF plant and pelletisers; hand picking stations; biological stabilisation; ball mills; other mechanical reduction techniques (crushing, pulverising etc.) The term 'mechanical biological treatment' (MBT) describes a hybrid process combining mechanical and biological techniques to sort and separate mixed municipal waste. Mixed waste processing can also be undertaken within an integrated facility which may also include composting and thermal treatment.

Monitoring Report: Records progress in implementing the Local Development Scheme and the performance of policies against targets in the Local Plan. Indicates what action an authority needs to take if it is not on track or policies need to be revised/ replaced.

Municipal Waste: Waste arising from households as well as other waste (such as commercial and industrial waste) which because of its nature or composition is similar to waste from households.

National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF): This document sets out the Government's planning policies for England. The NPPF must be taken into account in the preparation of Local and neighbourhood Plans and is a material consideration in planning decisions. It states that in order to be considered sound a Local Plan should be consistent with national planning policy.

National Planning Practice Guidance (PPG): A web-based resource published by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) on 6 March 2014 and updated as needed.

Non-hazardous waste: All non-hazardous waste as defined by The List of Wastes Regulations 2005. Included are for example municipal (household), commercial and industrial wastes.

Permitted reserves: Saleable minerals in the ground with planning permission for extraction. Usually expressed in million tonnes.

Planning Conditions: Conditions attached to a planning permission for the purpose of regulating and controlling the development.

Preferred Areas: If it is not possible to designate Specific Sites, the next way to plan for a steady and adequate supply of minerals is to designate preferred areas, which are areas of known resources where planning permission might reasonably be anticipated. Such areas may also include essential operations associated with mineral extraction.

Primary aggregates: Naturally occurring sand, gravel and crushed rock used for construction purposes.

Principal Aquifers: These are layers of rock or drift deposits that have high intergranular and/or fracture permeability - meaning they usually provide a high level of water storage. They may support water supply and/or river base flow on a strategic scale. In most cases, principal aquifers are aquifers previously designated as major aquifer.

Processing of Recyclables: Processing of recyclables will include all those operations that are designed to accept source-separated recyclate for processing and bulking-up prior to transport to downstream specialist re-processors. The recyclate is likely to originate from kerbside collection of materials that have been separated by individual householders and businesses, and also material from centralised recycling facilities (bottle banks, CA sites etc).

Pyrolysis: During pyrolysis organic waste is heated in the absence of air to produce a mixture of gaseous and liquid fuels and a solid inert residue (mainly carbon). Pyrolysis generally requires a consistent waste stream to produce a usable fuel product.

Radioactive waste: Radioactive wastes contain radioactive elements. Radioactive waste is categorised into nuclear and non-nuclear wastes. Nuclear wastes are from the nuclear power industry, while 'non-nuclear' wastes are generally from medical facilities and educational establishments. The majority of radioactive waste is 'low level waste' meaning that it has low levels of radioactivity.

Ramsar Site: A Site of Special Scientific Interest of international importance as waterfowl habitat designated under the Ramsar International Convention on Wetlands (1971).

Recovery: Includes recycling and composting operations as well as anaerobic digestion, thermal treatment operations which produce energy from waste (including fuel, heat and power) and some backfilling operations.

Recycled aggregates: Aggregates produced from recycled construction waste such as crushed concrete, planings from road surfacing etc.

Recycling: The process by which materials are collected and used as 'raw' materials for new products.

Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF): consists ofresidual waste that complies with the specifications in a written contract between the producer of the RDF and a permitted end-user for the thermal treatment of the waste in an energy from waste facility or a facility undertaking co-incineration such as cement and lime kilns. The written contract must include the end-user's technical specifications relating as a minimum to the calorific value, the moisture content, the form and quantity of the RDF.

Registered Parks and Gardens: Sites included in the Register of Parks and Gardens of special historic interest in England, compiled by Historic England via the Historic Buildings and Ancient Monuments Act 1953. The main purpose of this register is to help ensure that the features and qualities which make the landscapes registered to be of national importance are safeguarded during ongoing management or if any change is being considered which could affect them.

Renewable energy: Renewable energy is energy derived from resources that are regenerative (e.g. biomass) or for all practical purposes cannot be depleted (e.g. solar or wind power).

Residual waste: The elements of the waste stream that are left over after the segregation of recyclables and organic waste for biological treatment (such as composting or anaerobic digestion).

Restoration: Operations designed to return an area to an acceptable environmental state, whether for the resumption of the former land use or for a new use following mineral working or waste disposal. Involves the reinstatement of land by contouring, the spreading of soils or soil making materials etc.

Route hierarchy: Norfolk County Council's route hierarchy categorises roads by use, or desired use, influencing signage, improvement programmes, and maintenance priorities. At the top of the hierarchy are the:

  • Principal Roads (generally A roads); followed by
  • Distributor Roads (generally B roads); followed by
  • Local Access
  • HGV (heavy goods vehicle) access
  • Tourist accesses (generally class C roads)
  • Other roads (normally unclassified or C roads)

Safeguarding: Protecting existing, permitted and allocated sites that have potential for relevant development (waste and minerals) from other incompatible development.

Scheduled Monuments: Nationally important monuments and archaeological areas protected under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act

Screening: Screening may take a number of forms, which may include bunds, or planting, or a combination of these and may in some circumstances incorporate a standoff to ensure that the screening is not itself intrusive. Where screening is included in a site allocations policy or map it is 'indicative' and is intended only to illustrate where assessment at this stage has indicated that there may be impacts (for example on amenity or landscape) which, in principle, could require some form of screening to mitigate them. The form of screening which would be appropriate, if required, along with the distances and coverage of any screening would be determined following assessment of the detail of potential impacts, as part of any future planning application

Secondary aggregates: aggregates obtained as a by-product of other quarrying and mining operations, or aggregates obtained as a by-product of other industrial processes, such as coal fired power station ash, incinerator ash and spent foundry sand.

Secondary Aquifers: These include a wide range of rock layers or drift deposits with an equally wide range of water permeability and storage. Secondary aquifers are subdivided into two types:

Secondary A - permeable layers capable of supporting water supplies at a local rather than strategic scale, and in some cases forming an important source of base flow to rivers. These are generally aquifers formerly classified as minor aquifers;

Secondary B - predominantly lower permeability layers which may store and yield limited amounts of groundwater due to localised features such as fissures, thin permeable horizons and weathering. These are generally the water-bearing parts of the former non-aquifers.

Secondary Undifferentiated - has been assigned in cases where it has not been possible to attribute either category A or B to a rock type. In most cases, this means that the layer in question has previously been designated as both minor and non-aquifer in different locations due to the variable characteristics of the rock type.

Setting of a heritage asset: The surroundings in which a heritage asset is experienced. Its extent is not fixed and may change as the asset and its surroundings evolve. Elements of a setting may make a positive or negative contribution to the significance of an asset, may affect the ability to appreciate that significance or may be neutral.

Specific Sites (for mineral extraction): where viable resources are known to exist, landowners are supportive of minerals development and the proposal is likely to be acceptable in planning terms. Such sites may also include essential operations associated with mineral extraction. This is the preferred way to plan for the steady and adequate supply of minerals as it provides the necessary certainty on when and where development may take place.

Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs): Sites notified and protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 on account of their flora, fauna, geological or physiographical features.

Special Area of Conservation: An SSSI of international importance designated under the EC Directive on the Conservation of Natural Habitats and of Wild Fauna and Flora.

Special Protection Area: An SSSI of international importance designated under the EC Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds.

Statement of Community Involvement: A document that sets out a Local Planning Authority's intended consultation strategy for different elements of the planning process. This is a requirement brought in by the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004.

Strategic Environmental Assessment: A procedure (set out in the Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes Regulations 2004) which requires the formal environmental assessment of certain plans and programmes which are likely to have significant effects on the environment.

Surface water: All lakes, rivers, streams, springs, ponds, impounding reservoirs, wetlands, marshes, water sources, drainage systems on the Earth's surface.

Sustainability Appraisal: An evaluation process for assessing the environmental, social, economic and other sustainability effects of plans and programmes. This is a statutory requirement.

Sustainable development: Development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Thermal treatment: Can include incineration, gasification and pyrolysis. Techniques used include various moving grate systems and fluidised bed processes.

Transport assessment: This is a process which considers total travel demand; patterns of public transport in the area; how development impacts upon them; and if required how infrastructure or services could be improved to address the impacts (of a development).

Transport statement: Where transport issues are such that a full Transport Assessment is not required, a Transport Statement may be acceptable

Treatment: Involves the physical, chemical or biological processing of waste to reduce their volume, for segregation to reduce the harmfulness of the waste.

Waste arisings: The amount of waste generated in any given locality over a given period of time.

Waste Collection Authority: A local authority with a statutory responsibility to provide a waste collection service to each household in its area, and on request, to local businesses; in Norfolk the relevant district, borough or city council is the WCA.

Waste Disposal Authority: A local authority that is legally responsible for the safe disposal of municipal waste collected by the WCAs and the provision of Household Waste and Recycling Sites; in Norfolk the County Council is the WDA.

Waste management: The means of dealing with waste, including waste disposal, transfer, processing, recovery/recycling operations, incineration and other technologies.

Waste Planning Authority: An organisation with statutory planning powers relating to waste management development, in most areas the County or Unitary Council.

Waste transfer: Waste transfer is the process by which waste is taken from waste producers for treatment, recycling and/or disposal. Then, to minimise the cost of transport and to reduce environmental impacts, transfer stations are used to sort waste and to transfer it to larger vehicles for onward transport. The waste is usually sorted into wastes that can be recycled (such as metal, wood, soil and rubble) and the remaining waste that will be landfilled.

Wastewater (sewage): Comprises liquid and solid waste discharged by domestic residences, commercial properties, industry and agricultural activities, which is then carried to Water Recycling Centre via a network of foul sewers.

Windrow Composting: The aerobic decomposition of shredded and mixed organic waste using open linear heaps known as 'windrows', which are approximately three metres high and four to six metres across. The process involves mechanical turning of the waste until the desired temperature and residence times are achieved to enable effective degradation. This results in a bulk-reduced, stabilised residue known as compost. Windrow composting can take place outdoors or within a large building and the process takes around three months.

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